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Outdoor Grow Calendar for Australia

West, East, South and Central Australia

West, East, South and Central Australia

This part of Australia has a diverse climate. You may need to alter your growing methods according to your location–for example, a hotter, drier region will require more frequent watering for your plants. But overall, this calendar applies to the entire west, east, south, and central region of Australia.

August

August is the perfect time to start preparing your seeds. The temperatures aren’t quite optimal for growing, but you’ll be able to start growing within four weeks or less. Start gathering your supplies and preparing the soil. You can start germinating during this period if you want to get a head start on your crop.

September

Start sprouting those seeds! Plant them in the soil and place the pots on the windowsill. Your seeds will need 12 hours of sunlight a day to grow, so if your area of the country hasn’t reached 12 hours yet, you’ll need to use a grow lamp for the remaining few hours.

October

By now, your plants should be sprouting from the soil. If daytime temperatures reach 21 degrees Celsius, you can set your plants outside during the day, but be sure to bring them in again at night. They should be able to get 12 or 13 hours of natural daylight per day.

November

Summer has arrived, and your plants can stay outside all day and night. Just keep an eye on the temperature to make sure it doesn’t drop below 15 degrees Celsius. This is the perfect time to plant autoflowering seeds so they’ll be ready in February.

December

This month has the most natural daylight of the growing season, so your plants will grow rapidly during this time. Autoflowering plants will start to produce flowers. Your plants can remain outdoors day and night.

January

The temperatures are hot, but the natural daylight will start to decrease again. If you’re growing an autoflowering strain, you can expect large amounts of flowers. Non-autoflowering plants will be getting ready to flower. Be sure to identify and remove any male plants during this month before they start pollinating and ruin your entire crop.

February

Now your plant has really started flowering. Flowering plants actually do well in cooler temperatures, so make sure your plant isn’t exposed to temperatures above 28 degrees Celsius. If your plants get too hot, they’ll grow more slowly and the good parts of the plant might burn away.

March

The temperature is still hot, but daylight hours are rapidly decreasing. This is the time to harvest your plants if you haven’t done so already.

April

April is the official end of the growing season. If you haven’t yet harvested your plants, do so now before the temperature drops. A cold, wet climate can destroy your entire crop.

Northern Australia

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Northern Australia is known for its hot temperatures that last all year round, making it a great climate for growing marijuana. However, you’ll still want to stick to a grow calendar, as the dry and wet seasons can have a big impact on your crop. Mold and mildew are a big risk during the wet season, so consider ordering seeds that are mold-resistant.

August

The growing season’s about to begin, so start gathering your supplies and ordering seeds online if you haven’t done so already. This area of Australia might be hot all year round, but that doesn’t mean you can grow at any time of the year–September offers optimum temperatures and the perfect climate for your seeds.

September

Now that you’ve gathered your seeds, it’s time to start sprouting them. You can either wait until you have 12 hours of sunlight a day or sprout your plants in the windowsill and supplement the rest of the light with a grow lamp. Make sure you don’t expose your plants to temperatures over 28 degrees Celsius, as this can slow their growth and damage the plants.

October

By October, you should have over 12 hours of natural sunlight a day, making this the perfect time to move your plants outdoors. They should thrive outside in both daytime and nighttime, although you’ll have to water them regularly since you’re still in the dry season.

November

Your plants should be growing strong during the month of November. If you’re working with autoflowering plants, you can plant them now so they’ll be ready for harvest in February. November is the hottest month of the year in northern Australia, so make sure your plants are getting plenty of water.

December

Autoflowering plants will start to flower during this month. Non-autoflowering plants should still be growing nicely and reaching towering heights. You might start seeing increased rainfall, so keep an eye out for mold growth around your plants.

January

January is the wettest month of the year, putting your plants at high risk for mold and mildew growth. Check your plants regularly to make sure they’re healthy. Non-autoflowering plants will start getting ready to flower. If you have male plants in your crop, this is the time to remove them before they pollinate the female plants and ruin your harvest.

February

It’s time to harvest your autoflowering plants! Non-autoflowering plants still have some weeks to go, but they should be getting ready for harvest. The hours of daylight and the amount of rain will start to decrease again during this month.

March

When March arrives, it’s time to harvest your non-autoflowering plants. The hours of daylight are rapidly decreasing, and the sudden change in climate could harm your plants.

April

If you haven’t yet harvested your plants, do it now before the dry season begins in June. This is your last chance to harvest a healthy crop that you can enjoy throughout the rest of the year. Harvest your buds and hang them indoors to dry for a minimum of ten days.

2020-08-06T17:58:31+00:00

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